Audio Transcript

38m

Welcome to “Let’s Talk Loyalty”, an industry podcast for loyalty marketing professionals. I’m your host, Paula Thomas, and if you work in loyalty marketing, join me every week to learn the latest ideas for loyalty specialists around the world. Today’s guest has launched a marketing movement that I find truly inspiring with India facing its toughest challenge. Yet with the COVID pandemic, modern Pataki has created a task force of what he calls young warriors, leveraging loyalty mechanics, innovative technology and communication channels to mobilize the nation against the spread of COVID-19 known as you are modern organization has already partnered with over 1,350 organizations, including the ministry of health and family welfare and the ministry of youth affairs, as well as some of India’s biggest companies together, their goal is to lead action and support over 50 million people through this most challenging time.
1m 16s
0

But Dan’s program called uses points and rewards, but for a social cause rather than a commercial one. So today I’m really happy to welcome Madonna to let’s talk loyalty.
1m 31s
1

So Medan I’m super excited to hear the entire story of the young warriors movement. So before we get into all of it, obviously you’re not coming from a traditional loyalty background, but nonetheless, I know you’ve, you’ve prepared some of your favorite loyalty statistics or performance statistics for me too.
1m 48s
2

Thanks, Paula. Delighted to be on the show and look forward to this conversation. Yes. From the performance statistics. So the, the reach for the young warrior movement, we were actually compiling our numbers as of yesterday, glad to share that the young warrior movement in India has reached 431 million plus social media impressions. And we have 2.8, 3 million young people will now take an action in one way or the other in the young warrior woman. So not run up to the target or 5 million. I think we are progressing fairly rapidly.
2m 27s
1

That’s extraordinary Medan. And just for listeners and you went live literally just eight weeks ago with this movement, I’m calling it, which I hope is a really good way because that’s the scale of what I feel that you’re creating Medan. So what I think might be a really good place to, to start actually just with the, the, the chat about what you’re doing is can you explain where did the young warrior movement come from? Because in fact, it seems to me that you’re perfectly positioned to lead something like this with all of its innovation and all of its and you know, ambition. So yeah. Tell exactly how did you end up starting this movement to where it came from?
3m 3s
2

Sure. Young warrior movement is actually an initiative by an entity called UA, which operates on the UNICEF June. This stuff actually launched along with the UN entities in 2018 at the United nations general assembly global initiative called generation of limited. And the whole objective of generation unlimited limited was that how do you put young people at the center of the universe and empower the them and, and, and have a supportive ecosystem that will ensure that they are able to take the decisions they want in terms of their own career pathways, learning across several skills and also their own journey as change makers.
3m 49s
2

So the whole objective, all of generation unlimited is how do you ensure that every young person has all the necessary skills and the support to progress in life, to at least our number two potential. So generation unlimited came to India. India was one of the first countries to take on this initiative and we called it. The, you are in, in Hindi, you are means while view, right? So that’s what we courted. And we took on three objectives. So we did a series of consultations across the country in 2019, trying to understand what we heard, three things very, very strongly.
4m 33s
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One is the future of work is rapidly changing. And young people felt that they’re not adequately equipped to understand the future that is unfolding. And how do I deal with it? Right. What kind of curious would I choose? What kind of skills should I have?
4m 47s
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That’s one who
4m 49s
2

Is, of course there are deep aspirations to create economic opportunities for themselves to say that, you know what I need to not only support myself, but I need to ensure that my family is comfortable. Yeah. The third most interesting part was that several young people went beyond economic opportunities to say that I want to be a contributing member of my community in my society. Wow. I am not just a human resource, right? I want to be a leader. So those three elements we took and we conceived you are as a three pillars. We love one which will help young people create economic opportunities for themselves, either as entrepreneurs or job seekers.
5m 34s
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And we took a target to say, we want to create a hundred million opportunities in the next 10 years, pillar two was about life skills and 21st century skills. How do you equip every young person with the relevant life skills or 21st century skills? And we said, as a collaborative, as an ecosystem, can we enable 200 million young people to be, you know, how did I learn set of skills? And third was about their own aspirations to be Changemakers, to be societal leaders. And we said, let us lead the dot and let us vision and vision that to create 300 million young people as empowered change makers.
6m 18s
2

So those are the three teams we looking at in UA. Now, as we were doing this, we started, you know, creating young people action teams across the country. We have a very vibrant set of young people who give us advice on what we should be doing. And that is in one such conversation sometime in April, as the pandemic in India, started Peking, you know, as the second wave started, some of the young people’s door does that, why aren’t we doing anything? So we said, what do you want to do? Listen, Nope. We don’t have adequate information on what to, how to deal with it. You know, what a school would, the appropriate behavior with our tons of sources. We don’t know what is right. What is wrong?
6m 59s
2

We know we all have to take up vaccinations, but there’s a lot of hesitancy in my family on vaccination, so on and so forth. So how do I dispel that? And third, how do I make sure that it’ll, if somebody falls ill in my family, what are the five steps that I need to do? Right? So that’s how we said, what if we looked at each of you in your own homes as a young code warrior, and if we can equip you with tools and resources that can help you understand what’s happening, share it with your family. And perhaps you can go further, not just yet with your family, but share it to neighbors with your friends. Then each of you are securing maybe 10 families, right?
7m 42s
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So if you can enable 5 million young warriors to take, you know, action of the country and each of them impacting 10 families each, then we, we are securing 15 million people across the country in nine, a three month campaign. And that’s how the young warrior campaign got started. My
7m 58s
1

Goodness, Dan, it’s, it’s super inspiring. First of all, that you’re dedicating your time and your expertise. I know you’re a very successful Indian entrepreneur. And so to put your own way to, and resources, energy, and inspiration behind all of these people, I want to, first of all, acknowledge and congratulate you on all of that. I think it’s extraordinary. And, and what I also love actually, Medan that you’re doing is, is thinking big because something that I think a lot of us actually struggle, particularly when the world is struggling so much is it’s, it’s hard to be hopeful. It’s hard to be positive. And it’s hard to think at the scale that you do. So I love the big numbers, you know, to mobilize 5 million Indian people, young Indian people in order to impact 50 million.
8m 41s
1

And for listeners, certainly when I’ve been researching a bit about India in the past, I know that I think it’s by 20, 30 India will be the most populous nation. It will overtake China as the most people on the planet. So it’s as an extraordinary country that you live in.
8m 57s
2

Yeah. And, and, and we will have the youngest population of the world. We continue to have the youngest population of the world. Wow. You know, so yeah, it’s, it’s, it’s totally a blessing for me to be a part of initiatives like this, because you can really contribute to making a dent in the universe as it as
9m 15s
1

Yeah. Yeah.
9m 16s
2

And India is all about, you know, everything we do has to be large. It has to be at a population scale because we have like 10 continents in one.
9m 28s
1

Absolutely are. So given our audience, Madonna’s obviously loyalty professionals. So I guess human beings first. So the, the story of inspiration will definitely appeal regardless. But when you and I first met and parts of it was really around generational unlimited. In fact, we were going to have a conversation about that initially. And what I really liked Medan was you were tapping into loyalty mechanics. So things like, you know, identifying and behaviors, you wanted to change incentivizing that behavior change and rewarding it. So as you know, this show is normally very commercial or we’re talking to brands and we’re trying to get people to buy more or sell more or, or do more stuff in a commercial world.
10m 10s
1

So, so I think part of the reason I love this so much is that it’s a, it’s a social cause rather than a commercial one. So, so tell me, how did you, how did you come across or start to believe in the power of loyalty mechanics to, to drive the kind of behavior changes, whether it’s for the generation on limited project or for the young warriors COVID project.
10m 30s
2

Yeah, absolutely. You know, happy to share some thoughts and learn from you. It’s been fascinating chatting up with you and getting to understand the mechanics of how this space works, the loyalty space, but at a fundamental level, when we were chatting up with a whole lot of, one of the questions that we kept asking ourselves was what will not to them to do more. And, and here in this case is to do more good, to become change makers. We realize there are three, three drivers, right? One is that there, there is a larger societal need to do something beyond just academics.
11m 11s
2

If you’re on a school or a college in India or anywhere else, most likely are just measured on one parameter. How much, how many marks did you get? Yeah. Yeah. And that’s the, or writing
11m 21s
1

Metric definition of success. Exactly
11m 24s
2

What we all know that the correlation of marks to what you do in life is pretty low. It totally is. In many cases, there’s no correlation or there’s a negative correlation as well. So the question that we asked was what will make you feel good about yourself outside of the marks? And the first thing that came to us was listen, if somebody recognizes my effort, my talent, my passion, and say, you’ve used it for societal. Good was for number one, point number two was listen, you know, build that a materialistic rewards that I can get, you know, a gift voucher from an e-commerce site or, or, or a coffee.
12m 6s
2

Can you do something that if I’m really good and I’m putting my effort, can you help me progress ahead in my life? Can it be a reward in the form of a scholarship? Can it be a reward in the form of an internship, but one of the prestigious it companies in India, can it be, you know, if I’m interested in dance, can it be, you know, spend a day with a dance Mastro as an example, right? So what will, how can you, how can generation unlimited help us to progress on our career paths was that innate need to be able to help others.
12m 51s
2

Right? So as I progress along the journey, how can I use the rewards that I’ve earned, help others come up on the same journey as well? Right? So it’s almost like, you know, it’s almost like what we’ve seen happen in Gmail, or now the latest trending fashion clubhouse that if I do well, I get in my, I can invite other people and advice on soul five people, the other person feels good. So the third element that we’ve been toying around with is that if somebody has progressed well along a certain level, can that person, then she had some office credit to hook credits with, with another friend who was not on the journey. Yeah, absolutely.
13m 33s
2

So those are the elements that we started designing a social credit system reset for every action you take, you know, we will recognize you. It could be a simple certificate. So for example, the young warriors program, which has shipped out maybe about 25 or 30,000 certificates. So the first batch, which is a certificate from the school board. So interestingly regard the central board of secondary education, which is one of the largest school boards in the country saying, and a certificate from them and UNICEF, and of course are going, we recognize you as a young warrior. Now everybody’s used to seeing a score card from CBC and not a certificate. Right. So that does, that has gotten people excited to say, CBC is recognizing me for something that I did outside my academic realm.
14m 19s
1

Yeah. And it’s official and it’s global. So again, whether they go international, the fact that the UNICEF brand is on something, again, just add something in a super competitive world.
14m 31s
2

Yeah, absolutely. And it’s always been there, Paula, maybe you haven’t recognized it. So several U us studios that use, for example, look at not just your academics, but what change-making heavier done. Right. What contributions have you made to your society? Right. We want to bring something similar to admissions, to Indian universities and why should only scores matter. Yeah. Right. Why con why can’t your speech as a leader matter? Right. And can you then be given pathways because you excelled at something?
15m 4s
1

Absolutely. So moving it into UA and the young warriors movement then Medan. So what type of activities, what type of tasks, what are you asking of these young warriors? Because I know you have extraordinary communications campaign. You’ve mentioned 431 million impressions on social media and again, over eight weeks. So that’s exactly what I think we call a heavyweight campaign, but what are those communications saying? And what are you asking the young warriors to actually do in terms of taking action?
15m 36s
2

Sure. So the best is pretty simple. One on one of the learnings that we’ve had in this campaign is that if we want to scale something fast and big music to my ears, absolutely. You got complicated. So what for the young warrior, for the photo, for a young person, who’s between, we’ve got a young bloodiest from 20 to 24 years of age, we are saying simply saying, Hey, if you want to be a young warrior, WhatsApp is very prevalent in our country. We’ve actually created a WhatsApp chat bot. So there’s a simple number we’re saying, can you just send young warrior to that number? And the chat bot will walk you through a series of steps.
16m 19s
2

So if you’ve got several tasks, so the young person on the checkbook at home, we’ve got a, we’ve got a task card vaccine buddy in a series of conversations, we are exposing the young person to what is the vaccine? Why should you get vaccinated? Benefits of vaccination, myths that on vaccination, so on and so forth. And then we are asking the young person to go speak to five people and explain the facts and they come back and say, Hey, we’ve done this right. So it’s a CDs tasks sub-tasks that we provide. Lily does a task around fake news and fake news Felice. How do you verify news that comes to you on WhatsApp or Facebook or what go up 1, 2, 3 things you must do to check whether it is valid or not.
17m 3s
2

Right. We have another task around COVID appropriate behavior. We have a fourth task around what to do when somebody’s in your home fault, zip.
17m 15s
1

Wow.
17m 17s
2

So the call to action is simple. Just send a message to WhatsApp and we will, we’ll take you on from there. And so that is one, one way. Obviously, you know, there are media, dark areas in India and you can’t rely only on a technology and a smartphone in WhatsApp, or does out campaign through an IVR as well. Oh, okay. So the second thing is that we’ve got an IVR phone number where you can dial in and on the IVR, we’re having the same level of interactions. Wow. Right. And of course the third thing that we’ve done is that our many people and kids, especially in the, in the tribal areas and, and marginalized communities, availability itself, as a challenge, we have partnered with 200 community radio stations,
18m 5s
1

Wonderful. Which are beaming
18m 7s
2

Straight to radios and radios are available in many communities. And we are running a campaign on, on the radio as well. Right. We were talking about these and stuff like that. So we’ve covered all modes of engagement. It is, it is. We’re walking them through our funnel. So you do task one task, two task three and task four. And TASFA, and at the end of FASFA, you get a certificate. Yeah. In fact, just as off-board, we launched a fairly large campaign with the all India council for technical education, the entity that runs all, all the universities, all the engineering colleges and engineering universities in India, about 450 of them, roughly about a million and a half students.
18m 50s
2

And we are now asking these young people in the universities to go beyond this and saying, Hey, supposing you are a singer. Right. Can you, can you write a song? And, and, and, and then render it around being a young warrior, if you’re an artist, can you post a very interesting poster online? Wow. Right. And, and, and, and back people. So we’re running a competition. We’re running a week long initiative with the ACTE, several teams. What can you do on your talent? What can you do? So if I am the student leaders in my college, can I organize a hundred guys to come and attend the seminar?
19m 33s
2

And for every action, Vietnam giving out points. So you’d do a poster. You got to set up points. You do, you post it on social media, you get points. You, you amplify it, you get points. So we’re not trying to track all of that through a simple tech backend.
19m 49s
1

Wow. And do you actually validating Medan? Like, I mean, because it’s so appealing and we’ve talked about how competitive it is in academia and in life. So clearly these certificates are becoming increasingly aspirational. So are you, are you allowing them to self-report and self-manage or are you saying, well, look, we, we, you know, we need to see the five tags, for example, if it’s a social media tagging task. So, so what approach are you taking?
20m 18s
2

Well, it’s a very important question, especially as we go deeper and deeper into the tasks, right. Where the sentence starts becoming more and more valuable, of course, which is the journey that we have now in the next few months, we are now getting into a validation phase. One of the things that we’re trying to do is to set up a peer review validation process. Right. So, so, so if I’ve got, so I will have people, some of the young people sign up as validate those as well. And maybe we give them a certificate for being the validators. Of course, it’s a virtuous circle. Madonna, exactly.
20m 59s
2

Keep passing on all the people who apply colossal certified them, or all applying for validations to say, Hey, have completed the task. We just assign these tasks to these, the validators you’re certifying. So maybe out of the five people won’t be assigned the three of them certified PRN.
21m 20s
1

Yeah, absolutely.
21m 22s
2

One. The second thing that we are taking an example or trying to build it, and this is underway. It was almost like, you know, Amazon, for example, long ago had a, had a tool called . It was called mechanical Turk, which could break up a series of tasks into smaller images. And then you could have people taking those images to say whether it’s a cat or not a cat does an example. Of course. So it’s an AI ML tagging malware. So we in our Brian to talk to a few technology companies to say, Hey, is there are, let’s say somebody has said, I have uploaded this post, my fly five posters. We then take each poster and give it to one, one task runner who then says, is it a poster? Is it, is it not a poster?
22m 3s
2

Yeah. So the guy clicks, yes. Then it goes to the validation. So we’re trying to figure out, because as you rightly said, Paula, we have to think of population scale. Right. So we have to think about what if 10 million people tomorrow apply to us for validation? How will we
22m 18s
1

Exactly. Yeah. Because in order to retain the integrity of the certificate, it has to be something that is, that is trusted and known to be, you know, valid. So, so, and I think it’s fabulous because I think what you’ve managed to combine is, you know, speed to market in terms of get it up and running, get the partnerships, whether it’s with radio or, or the chat bot, for example, and, and get moving and then, you know, build in the artificial intelligence and the, you know, the validation piece as you get the scale piece in there. So, so I think it’s a perfect balance between, you know, let’s get started, but, you know, let’s make sure we keep an eye on it properly as well.
22m 56s
2

Yeah. I mean, that’s probably the only entrepreneurial this because, you know, , so you’re figuring out a lot of these unknown unknowns as you go along. Brilliant,
23m 8s
1

Brilliant. But, and again, I suppose the audience are very familiar with loyalty fraud, for example, is a theme. So particularly if there’s commercial, incense incentives, for example, like if you did start, you know, giving coffees or giving drinks or who knows what you might get into in the future. And then of course, things like, as you said, scholarships and internships. So, so the, the motivation perhaps to try and beat the system will, will increase. So, so again, you’re taking, as you said, the proper tech tech solution in place. And then the next thing I wanted to ask you about is I think, you know, it’s my favorite topic and many of my listeners I’m sure will know as well. It’s, it’s around the chat bot and the functionality, because I did use your WhatsApp chat bot, because again, it’s obviously global and you’d kindly sat me on the, the number for you off.
23m 57s
1

It was playing with your chat bot yesterday. And I thought it was incredible. So I’d love to hear, like, how did you build it? Was this something like, it felt like you built it actually very quickly and it’s still very comprehensive and very professional has a points system. So, so do you have a loyalty engine behind it or is everything managed and WhatsApp? How do you do it?
24m 17s
2

Yeah. So this pretty fast, it’s still getting done underway. So you report, you know, UNICEF has a global partnership with WhatsApp and we have a tool called , which was used primarily for service. So it, you could do surveys of any shots using the chalkboard that’s been on for the last couple of years, but we envision something going as a WhatsApp university for young people to learn on WhatsApp. So we called it for new and how do you have fun with doing stuff and learning by doing right?
24m 59s
2

So, which is why you will see in the tech bot, you know, some tasks. I go talk to your parents about the score, talk to five friends, go talk to them, you know, strangers, so on and so forth, right? So the whole idea of using the check mark wants to drive interactivity, but to drive young people, to do some stuff and come into the port back golf course, as we, as we spoken to the previous question, we need to have a validation, proof point there, which we’ll come to, you know, which way, but the idea was like, how do you get, how do you keep nudging at the beauty of the chat bar does that? It is very conversational. It is very easy.
25m 39s
2

You’re not dumping them like, like in our typical examination process at question with a hundred marks for all of this, we can walk them along the journey. One step at a time we are having the data dump at the backend with all the points. And as we speak, and I’ll working with a bunch of large experts in India on how do you make sense of the data that’s coming up, right. Again, from a loyalty standpoint, there are various nuances to this, right. So do you give, you know, a higher rating to a person who’s been consistent every week or you give, so even though the end result may be the same.
26m 20s
2

Yeah. Do you give, how do you track consistency was a sporadic performance. Okay. All right. And then give a better incentive for somebody who’s being consistent rather than spikes up and down. And how do you then indicate this to the system, to everybody else that this is what we’re looking for, the you as an example. Yeah. So we’re trying to figure out a bunch of rules and Jen here. In fact, at this point in my share that we’re also very fortunate to working, to be working with PWC global compounding polyphenols. And we are trying to create a massive platform, which will then take every young person and create a portfolio of, of, of engagement that they’ve done with you or with any other partner.
27m 13s
2

This portfolio can be then is, will be validated, verified, et cetera. And you can then share this portfolio and the portfolio will come with a bunch of credit points. Wonderful. So hopefully in the next couple of years, we should be able to build out this massive platform, which is a youth engagement, social credit tracking and portfolio system. Yes.
27m 33s
1

Yeah. But as you said, with data at the individual level, something they can share, and I guess something that UNICEF globally and generation unlimited globally, because they know it’s in multiple markets can also perhaps leverage in the future as well.
27m 47s
2

Well, absolutely. You know, we are trying to envision a future where there shouldn’t be an exam to find out how good you are. Exactly. Which will continuously provide you feedback and incentives to keep claiming absurd. It’s almost like how many of our children are play games, right? So you go from one level to another and each level has a certain level of difficulty tasks, et cetera. So that’s the kind of thinking that we’re trying to attempt.
28m 27s
1

Wonderful. And it’s also multilanguage as well. Medan, I think it’s Hindi. Am I right? I’m looking at 11 languages. Oh my goodness. And which are the two that I see. So obviously for listeners, Madonna, I’ll make sure that the, and the WhatsApp number is shared in our show notes and even in the email campaign. So hopefully you’re happy for loyalty professionals to add, to play with it as well. And oh, I’ll, I’ll definitely be telling you all of my, I love it. I really love it. And, but what is the second language that I see coming through? I don’t recognize the, the, the script.
29m 2s
2

So we have English and Hindi and then we have a bunch of languages. We have Canada Telegu
29m 8s
1

Wow. Yes, it did offer me. Yes.
29m 11s
2

Yeah,
29m 13s
1

Yeah, yeah. So it’s super clever Capra captures all of the location, all of the demographics and awards points immediately just for kind of signing up. And then there’s, I can see a referral model, which I went into was the next step. And also what I really loved Madonna as well was it was asking me how worried I was about COVID, which is obviously the main topic today and of the young warriors. So, so you’ve connected in obviously then with social support mechanics, things like lines, so they can actually get kind of emotional support as well if they need it.
29m 45s
2

So we’ve done. I think one of the other feedback that we got very actively was creating safe spaces for, for the mental wellbeing of the young people themselves. So one dimension is we are asking them to be warriors and, and take care of themselves and their families. But more importantly, they’re also saying, listen, we also need to be taken care of in the sense that we need to ensure our own emotional will be. So we’re doing a lot of, you know, workshops, we’re lining up a lot of partners to provide safe spaces for young people to come and talk about their own emotional wellbeing. And, you know, so that’s, that’s a big part of the campaign as
30m 26s
1

Well. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And you’ve mentioned some of your partners as well, Madame, for example, in terms of, you know, you know, certainly the public sector, for example, I know there’s a number of ministries you work with. I know you’ve also mentioned academia. You’ve also mentioned media partnerships. Yeah. And also the private sector, you mentioned PWC, but I know tech Mahindra, for example, and some other very big companies. So, so what way are you interfacing with the private sector? Is it around the kind of internships idea you mentioned earlier, or, or what’s your intention with those types of partnerships?
30m 60s
2

Private sex is a very critical ecosystem partner. And you know, sometimes you are a doer. We ended up playing the bridge between being the bridge between all of these types of partners, right? The private sector participation, then you are, and specifically now in young warriors, women has been phenomenal. Well, for example, we’ve got, you know, folks like tech Mahindra who have now reached out to their entire employee population of young people to say, Hey, all of you should become young warriors and encourage your neighbors and your offense to become young warriors as well, because it is still a very young workforce that we have on G workforce in India.
31m 42s
2

Do several of these corporate partners are also helping us amplify the message. One of the things that, that you might be aware of is India has something called as a corporate social responsibility act off the profits of every corporate must be given to social causes.
32m 1s
1

That’s I did not know that’s extraordinary
32m 3s
2

Or it’s extraordinary. You get like, like a couple of billion dollars worth of grind school every year. Wow. From, from all corporates in India. And it’s a mandatory act, wow. Legally required hundreds and thousands of end-users in the country. So there’s an interesting interface between NGOs and the corporate. And we are trying to reach out to various users through the corporate network as well. Right. And lastly, of course, conferences seeing this as a way to engage with the young people, the young people of today will be the employees of the future or what goes in the future customers of the future.
32m 47s
2

So corporates are also looking at a way to understand the minds of the young people and to build the brand by providing a better idea of benefits. So we’ve just begun, but lots and lots of action to do on the corporate site.
33m 2s
1

Yeah. Yeah. And as you mentioned that as well, Madonna, I wanted to pick up on something, which I’ve always again admired when, when I hear what you’re doing, you actually always ask young people what they want. Like you’re not making these decisions from your side. You’re very much talking to these advisors and people of the profile that you’re trying to impact.
33m 22s
2

Well, that’s been one of the most difficult learnings because it’s so easy to sit in and said, this is what young people want. Unfortunately, you know, most of the policies and directions are done by people who have reposted and saying, we think young people need one of the conscious decisions that we made at a germination unlimited. And specifically, if you are used to say that, you know, how do we make sure that everything we do comes as, as, as, as a, as a need or as a feedback from the young people. And we have a fascinating group of about 20 or a utopia formed at the national level called the young people action team has a governance structure, you know, minimum.
34m 12s
2

We have our board meeting, which has about 80 of our partners. It’s always proceeded by a board meeting with these young people to have them attend the main board meeting and represent their views there and did take the board conversations back to the young people. So that’s the whole idea. How do you build a super collaborative system, which really puts young people at the central office?
34m 34s
1

Yeah. Yeah. I can hear it coming through and yes, as you said, it’s an incredible learning, but it’s, it’s fundamental. It’s foundational. And that’s, I think what people hear when they see something like a young warriors movement, you know, they feel like it’s, it’s in their language, it’s in their technology, it’s in their, you know, it’s in their style of communication. So that’s obviously coming through from your task force.
34m 59s
2

Exactly. And I think, you know, it’s easy to slip back into, into being the Sage on stage and saying this for the group part of the team, we have a, we have a fairly strong secretariat in Delhi and part is several of them are young people. So they become our conscience keepers within the deem as well.
35m 22s
1

Very good. We all need a conscience keeper. Right? Well, listen, Medan. I think that’s all of the questions that I have from my side. I will certainly make sure, as I said to, to have links to you are so people can look up the organization for young warrior and obviously for generation unlimited, but are there any other points that you want to make for this audience before we wrap up our conversation?
35m 48s
2

Nothing specific, except that we are still in our early stages of the journey, there’s a lot of learnings that we need. So love to get feedback from all of you listening in on what we can do, what we can do better as it is, any which way to collaborate in any, any form of fashion, especially to kind of build better engagement models with our young people. I would really appreciate that.
36m 16s
1

Okay. Okay. Well, that’s a beautiful invitation Medan. I’ll make sure again, that everybody knows where to find you. So I know you’re very active on LinkedIn, for example. So if we look up you Medan on, on LinkedIn, I think you’re fairly easy to find. Yes.
36m 30s
2

Fairly easy to find them. It’s not a, it’s not a very common name in India, so you won’t find too many mother Buc-ee’s in India.
36m 37s
1

Okay. Well again, I’ll make sure I’ll, let’s talk loyalty. You’re, you’re linked there as well. Medan. So from my side, as I said, at the very beginning, it’s a super inspiring story and the loyalty points, rewards, changing behavior. It’s exactly what we’re, we’re all about. You know, it’s actually making a difference and I love you’re doing something for a social cause at this particular challenging time. So want to really say thank you so much from our side and best of luck from let’s talk loyalty.
37m 2s
2

Thank you so much for having me on the show and really enjoyed this conversation.
37m 10s
0

This show is sponsored by “The Wise Marketer”, the world’s most popular source of loyalty marketing news, insights and research. The Wise Marketer also offers loyalty marketing training, both online and in workshops around the world through its Loyalty Academy, which has already certified over 150 executives in 18 countries as Certified Loyalty Marketing Professionals.
53m 50s
2

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